Let’s meet Eddie Sanders

img_0845Eddie Sanders, M.Ed., is a native of rural Toomsboro,GA. He is an alumnus of Savannah State University, graduating with a degree in English Language Arts. Eddie is recently an M.Ed. graduate of Georgia Southwestern State University.

Eddie teaches elementary school, but has launched OSEA (OnSite Education Anywhere). As a Private Family Educator for working minors and home-schooled students, Eddie’s primary purpose is to provide a unique learning experience for the student who is on-the-go.

In addition to all Eddie does, he is an advocate for justice. I’m proud of Eddie for boldly proclaiming “unpopular truths,” even when feeling apprehensive. He knows he must speak out. Not only does he speak out, he seeks solutions.

I had so much fun speaking with Eddie (as I always do). He’s expressive, funny and serious simultaneously.

Let’s get into this conversation:

img_0843Me: Tell me about Eddie? (I gave Eddie my little speech about what this question means. On the many interviews I’ve done, people often answer what they do instead of who they are.)

Eddie: I am a small town country boy. Rural Toomsboro, GA had a population of less than 1000 people. I grew up weird, counting trees because my imagination ran wild. I hated being in a small town with little opportunities. As a kid, I wanted more and knew it would be through education.

In my mind, education was the key to my success. I had an uncle who did well for himself and advocated for college. I thought I would go to college and get money. I thought people who went to college had money. When I began my college career, I didn’t know what I wanted to do I just knew to major in English.

I had a fascination with creativity which at first was limited to people in img_0842church. I knew a lady who could sing like Dorinda Clark Cole and play the organ like Twinkie Clark. I wondered if people loved her beyond her gift. She would say she wanted to be in the entertainment industry.

I remember the discussion around this young lady. People was saying she was crazy. It bothered me that people are used like Christmas gifts – used until it breaks. It was then I knew I wanted to become a personal assistant or counselor.

I am humble enough to follow, but confident enough to lead. I’m concerned with justice for the “underdog.”

I’m also: Shy. Loyal. A Leader. Rebellious. An Advocate. Innovative.

Me: What does an overcomer mean to you?

Eddie: Imagine a mountain…a swift exchange. Imagine an airplane flying over it. There’s quick movement. The mountain is such a large, object but the peak is a little smaller. Once you climb to the top, you have overcome.

When you look down, you can either pity yourself for having to climb the mountain, or you can look down and grab others that are climbing the mountain after you.

How you choose to respond makes you an overcomer. (👀 I forgot to tell you, Eddie can preach. This was one of those moments right here. Selah. Ssshhh, don’t tell him I said it.)

Me: What have you overcome?

Eddie: Hate for my father. I used to hate him so much. I began to realize that hate is directly related to hypocrisy – the child of hypocrisy. I could no longer ask God for the grace I wouldn’t extend to others. I listened to his story and how he was raised. He was neglected by his father. I realized his neglect came from being uneducated. Uneducated in the sense that he didn’t know how to be a father.

img_0844As a kid, I didn’t fit with the group because my parents were married when I was born and they were in the church, but my father left when I was two years old. I remember not knowing where my story fit and why his family didn’t hold him accountable. My father is very silent. There was no one around to ask them the right questions – if they had, my parents would have never married. Remember, I’m from the country and marriage is promoted more than wholeness.

Me: How long did it take you to get to the point of love and forgiveness?

Eddie: Years. My father grew up in the city, and I was in the country. We didn’t have much. When we did come to Atlanta, we would usually stay with an uncle or grandmother. They lived in nice homes; they had a completely different lifestyle. It was like two different worlds.

I felt less than. It affected my self-esteem. I felt like my father didn’t want me in the family.

I started the process after coming to All Nations Worship Assembly – Atlanta (ANWA) and began to hear about healing, forgiveness and rejection. Although I rejected this notion at first, I began to have compassion for him.

Me: Has this played a pivotal part in how you are today?

Eddie: Yes. I was one of the popular kids in school, but I still felt like the underdog. I was the homecoming king and class president. However, it didn’t stop me from being bullied. I had to learn how to “come back” very easily. This is why I am the way I am about injustice.

Me: I am glad that in everything you went through, you didn’t allow it to muzzle you. You didn’t allow it to take your voice.

Eddie: You know, growing up I really believed the bible. I believed everything they told me. I believed we are all the same and if you’re wrong, you’re wrong, no matter who you are and what your title is. I didn’t learn the alternative until I got older.

Me: Tell me about OSEA. How did it come about?img_0841

Eddie: In college wanted to work in the entertainment industry. You remember when Whitney Houston died? No one really knew that her and Kim Burrell was that close. Kim covered her, showed herself to be a true friend. I want to be a Kim Burrell for others.

My career is the epitome of the scripture that says, “all things work together for good…” (Romans 8:28).

When I graduated college, I knew I needed to get a job. I wanted to travel, but I knew I needed to teach. I went to get  an MDiv but dropped out after the first month. Every day when I went to school, my head would hurt terribly. I knew I was supposed to teach and it wasn’t the season for divinity school. I thought I would meet an athlete and tutor his child.

I went back home and worked at Dollar General for a while. The people in my hometown encouraged me to work at the school as a teacher. Although I took the job,  I could not ignore the desire to work in entertainment.

Shortly after, I moved to Atlanta with a refund check and a promise from a friend to sleep on their sofa. People told me I wouldn’t find a job because I needed experience. I received multiple offers.

When I started coming to ANWA, people were asking what brought me to Atlanta, which made me remember why I came here.

Young actors and actresses, minors of actors. Who will educate them? God said, “You will.”

OnSite Education Anywhere (OSEA) was born!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ME: Tell me, where do see yourself in five years?

img_0847Eddie: I see myself as the founder behind a brand that is a household name. OSEA being in homes and on sets. Much traveling and touring along with the ability to hire.

Anywhere there is a working minor, OSEA will be and we won’t be too far removed from the local home-schooled students.

My vision is to purchase houses throughout the Atlanta area and the world and turn them into home schools.

Me: I admire your strong stance on justice and advocacy. What do you see yourself doing with that?

Eddie: Advocacy? I don’t know right now. And it’s okay you add that. People should know you won’t always have the answers. (Don’t you just love him?)

You may find Eddie “Mr. Osea” here:
Website: onsiteed.org
Facebook: Eddie Sanders
IG: onsite_ed

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